Developing Digital Humanities Projects

3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT May 2, 2013

The authors of DevDH.org will introduce participants to best practices for designing and organizing their first digital humanities project, including how to frame a project appropriately, identify and set attainable goals, build project teams, and find potential tools and resources. Early-career digital humanists are especially encouraged to attend. (Times EDT)
Description

No matter how we define the digital humanities, a successful project relies on effective planning, organizing, motivating, and use of finite resources to achieve scholarly goals. Drawing on a combined 10+ years of experience in digital humanities development, this seminar will introduce participants to best practices for designing and organizing their first digital humanities project and will focus on how to frame a project appropriately, identify and set attainable goals, build project teams, and find potential tools and resources. Co-led by Jennifer Guiliano, Assistant Director of the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities, and Simon Appleford, Associate Director for Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences at the Clemson CyberInstitute, the seminar will highlight proven approaches for starting a first digital humanities project with little to no local resources. Finally, it will offer a forum for participants to discuss strategies for putting in place the fundamentals that their project will need throughout its initial stages and that will help ensure its long-term success.

Recommended Reading
Speakers

Simon Appleford is associate director for humanities, arts, and social sciences at the Clemson CyberInstitute, and an adjunct lecturer in history at Clemson University. Simon received a Masters of Arts in modern history and a Masters of Literature in modern American history from the University of St. Andrews, Scotland, and is currently completing his Ph.D. in history from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Prior to joining Clemson University in 2011, he was assistant director at the University of Illinois’ Institute for Computing in Humanities, Arts, and Social Science. Together with Jennifer Guiliano, he is co-author of the digital resource, DevDH.org.

Jennifer Guiliano received a Bachelors of Arts in English and history from Miami University (2000), a Masters of Arts in history from Miami University (2002), and a Masters of Arts (2004) in American history from the University of Illinois before completing her Ph.D. in history at the University of Illinois (2010). She currently is an assistant director at the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities at the University of Maryland and co-author with Simon Appleford of the digital resource, DevDH.org.

Registration

This seminar is for humanists, librarians, and instructional technologists who are interested in learning best practices for developing their first digital humanities projects. It is especially relevant for early-career digital humanists, including graduate students and junior scholars planning or considering their first digital project. We encourage scholars and others from the NITLE Network interested in collaborative digital projects to attend in teams if possible.

Please register online by Tuesday, April 30, 2013. Participation in NITLE Shared Academics events is open to all active member institutions of the NITLE Network as a benefit of membership and as space allows. No additional registration fee applies.

Questions

For more information about this event, please contact Rebecca Davis at rdavis@nitle.org.


NITLE Shared AcademicsTM models a new approach to liberal education – made possible through strategic collaboration, driven by shared knowledge, and supported by emerging technologies. Campuses learn how inter-institutional academic exchange works by actively participating in it, building the knowledge and experience to re-architect liberal education.