Crowdsourcing

1:00pm - 2:00pm EDT May 8, 2013

Mia Ridge, a scholar of the role of crowdsourcing in cultural heritage, provides an overview of crowdsourcing, citizen science, citizen history, and other participatory projects, leading a discussion of how and why students might contribute to such projects. (Times EDT)
Description

Crowdsourcing means getting the general public to do tasks towards a larger goal. There are a variety of opportunities out there for motivated students to engage in the process of digitizing, preserving, and studying collective resources and data. Such projects involve students in large-scale collaboration and authentic tasks, which contributes to student engagement. They get the sense that they are contributing to something larger and experience the power of networks to produce knowledge. Crowdsourcing may also help students meet essential learning outcomes of liberal education such as gaining knowledge of culture, global engagement, and applied learning. In this seminar, Mia Ridge, a scholar of the role of crowdsourcing in cultural heritage will provide an overview of crowdsourcing, citizen science, citizen history, and other participatory projects, leading a discussion of how and why students might contribute to such projects.

Recommended Reading
Speaker

Mia Ridge is currently researching a Ph.D. in digital humanities (Department of History, Open University), focusing on historians and scholarly crowdsourcing. She has published and presented widely on her key areas of interest including: user experience design, human-computer interaction, open cultural data, audience engagement, and crowdsourcing in the cultural heritage sector. Formerly Lead Web Developer at the Science Museum Group (UK), Ms. Ridge has worked internationally as a business analyst, digital consultant and web programmer in the cultural heritage and commercial sectors. She has post-graduate qualifications in software development (RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia, 2001) and an MSc in Human-Centred Systems (City University, London, 2011). Editor of the forthcoming volume “Crowdsourcing our Cultural Heritage,” she tweets at http://twitter.com/mia_out and blogs at http://openobjects.blogspot.com/

Registration

Faculty, instructional technologists, librarians and others from the NITLE Network interested in participatory learning should attend this seminar. Attendance by institutional teams is encouraged; individuals are also welcome to participate.

Please register online by Monday, May 6, 2013. Participation in NITLE Shared Academics events is open to all active member institutions of the NITLE Network as a benefit of membership and as space allows. No additional registration fee applies.

Questions

For more information about this event, please contact Rebecca Frost Davis at rdavis@nitle.org.


NITLE Shared Academics logoNITLE Shared AcademicsTM models a new approach to liberal education – made possible through strategic collaboration, driven by shared knowledge, and supported by emerging technologies. Campuses learn how inter-institutional academic exchange works by actively participating in it, building the knowledge and experience to re-architect liberal education.