Games in Education: A Classroom Perspective

2:00pm - 3:00pm EDT October 17, 2013

What is the value of games in a liberal arts context? Are there ways in which they can be used to complement curricular objectives and help students develop skills critical for 21st-century life and work? Examine the use of games with a panel of educators who have experimented with them in the classroom. (Times EDT)
Description

Recognized for their power to engage, games are quickly being recognized as a powerful teaching tool. In “Games in Education,” a special issue of Transformations from the Academic Commons, authors and interviewees examine the unique ways in which games provide experiential learning in the classroom. Join authors Brett Boessen, associate professor of media studies at Austin College, Todd Bryant, liaison to the foreign language departments for the Academic Technology group at Dickinson College and adjunct instructor of German, and Ed Webb, assistant professor of political science and international studies at Dickinson College, as they discuss the pedagogical principles that underlie games and how taking advantage of the popularity of games in our culture can be an effective tool for engaging students in the classroom.

Recommended Reading

Please review and explore these resources to prepare for active engagement with your fellow seminar participants.

Boessen, B. (2013). This Is Not a Game (It’s a Class): Lessons Learned From an In-Class Alternate Reality Game (ARG). “Games in Education,” Transformations, a publication of the Academic Commons. Georgetown, TX: National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education.

Bryant, T. (2013). Challenges to Games in Education Reaching the Mainstream. “Games in Education,” Transformations, a publication of the Academic Commons. Georgetown, TX: National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education.

Webb, E. (2013). Learning (Together) with Games – Civilization and Empire. “Games in Education,” Transformations, a publication of the Academic Commons. Georgetown, TX: National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education.

Seminar Leaders

Brett Boessen is an associate professor of media studies at Austin College. He both teaches courses on games studies and uses games in his courses as a means to facilitate that learning. In the spring of 2008, his class on new media collectively designed and ran an Alternate Reality Game (ARG). Lessons learned from that experience—as well as later ones—have enabled him to develop his understanding of how to manage such assignments and how they impact student learning.

Todd Bryant is the liaison to the foreign language departments for the Academic Technology group at Dickinson College and an adjunct instructor of German. His interest in games began with his own use of World of Warcraft in an introductory German course, and he has helped others integrate games into courses as well. Through his experience with complex strategy games to alternate reality games to board games, he is able to provide a broad overview of options for educators who want to use games pedagogically.

Ed Webb is an assistant professor of political science and international studies at Dickinson College and a founder of Dickinson’s Middle East Studies program. Formerly a member of Britain’s Diplomatic Service, his teaching and research interests in the Middle East include secularism, nationalism, education, authoritarianism, and media. He has experimented for several years with digital and social media in and around the classroom and also served on NITLE’s inaugural advisory board (2009-2011).

Event Hashtag

Participants are encouraged to share their thoughts on Twitter via this event’s hashtags: #gamesineducation and #NITLE.

Registration

Those interested in using games in the classroom to achieve pedagogical goals should attend this seminar. Attendance by institutional teams is encouraged; individuals are also welcome to participate.

Please register online by Tuesday, October 15. Participation in NITLE Shared Academics is open to all active member institutions of the NITLE Network as a benefit of membership and as space allows. No additional registration fee applies.

Questions

For more information about this event, please contact Georgianne Hewett at ghewett@nitle.org.


NITLE Shared AcademicsTM models a new approach to liberal education – made possible through strategic collaboration, driven by shared knowledge, and supported by emerging technologies. Campuses learn how inter-institutional academic exchange works by actively participating in it, building the knowledge and experience to re-architect liberal education.