Kenyon College Librarian Selected As First Rick Peterson Fellow

August 24, 2011

(Washington, D.C.; Georgetown, TX; Lexington, VA) Meghan Frazer, digital resource librarian at Kenyon College, is the recipient of the first Rick Peterson Fellowship. Co-sponsored by the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) and the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE), the fellowship will be awarded annually to an early career IT professional or librarian who has reached beyond traditional boundaries to resolve a significant challenge or critical problem facing IT/digital libraries.

Ms. Frazer received the fellowship on the basis of her collaborative work with OhioLINK and The Five Colleges of Ohio and on “The Community Within” project, which digitally archives and provides “online free access to historical records of the Black community life and experience in Knox County, Ohio.” The selection committee also noted Ms. Frazer’s broader contributions to Kenyon College’s Library and Information Services. The fellowship will support Ms. Frazer’s participation in the 2012 NITLE Symposium and CLIR’s DLF Forum.

“In recognizing Meghan Frazer with this fellowship, we hope to call attention to the importance of collaborating across professional boundaries,” said Joey King, NITLE executive director. “Breaking down silos both on campus and across organizations is critical to advancing the mission of liberal education.”

“CLIR and NITLE developed the Rick Peterson Fellowship to honor a friend and colleague known for his willingness and ability to collaborate,” added CLIR president Charles Henry. “The successful advancement of knowledge—exemplified by projects such as ‘The Community Within’—depends on the strong relationships that effective collaboration develops.”

The Rick Peterson Fellowship honors the life and work of the late Richard (Rick) Allen Peterson, an active promoter of collaboration in the area of information technology services and digital libraries and former chief technology officer at Washington and Lee University. Charles Henry, Joey King, and David Saacke, executive director of Information Technology Services at Washington and Lee University, served as this year’s selection committee.

Individuals or organizations wishing to make a tax-deductible contribution to the Rick Peterson Fellowship may send donations to the Council on Library and Information Resources, 1752 N Street, NW #800, Washington, DC 20036. Please earmark your check “Peterson Fellowship.”


About the Council on Library and Information Resources

CLIR is an independent, nonprofit organization that forges strategies to enhance research, teaching, and learning environments in collaboration with libraries, cultural institutions, and communities of higher learning. Its Digital Library Federation (DLF) program runs an annual Forum, which serves as a meeting place, marketplace, and congress for digital library practitioners. The 2011 Forum will be held October 31-November 2 in Baltimore. CLIR’s website is at Information on the DLF is available at

About the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education

The National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education helps liberal arts colleges integrate inquiry, pedagogy, and technology. It is the key organization for liberal arts institutions seeking to use technology strategically to advance the liberal-arts mission. The 2012 NITLE Symposium will be held April 16-17 in Arlington, Virginia. It is an open, cross-professional, national venue for exchange between faculty, technologists, librarians, and administrators at liberal arts institutions. It will focus on inter-institutional collaboration and/or innovations extensible to other campuses, such as new learning resources and models, scholarly communication, digital humanities, and other topics relevant to the future of liberal arts colleges. (

About Washington and Lee University

Washington and Lee University, the nation’s ninth oldest institution of higher education, is among the nation¹s premier liberal arts colleges and universities. Washington and Lee University provides a liberal arts education that develops students’ capacity to think freely, critically, and humanely and to conduct themselves with honor, integrity, and civility. Graduates are prepared for life-long learning, personal achievement, responsible leadership, service to others, and engaged citizenship in a global and diverse society. (